Tag Archives: Peru

South America Awards: 3 Month Review

    • Time: Three Months
    • Countries Visited: Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Peru, Ecuador & Colombia
    • Distance Travelled (total from UK): 25,781 km
    • Distance Travelled (in South America): 18,289 km
    • Time Spent On Buses: 7 Days
    • Time Spent On Boats: 10.5 Days
    • Time Spent On Aeroplanes: 1.5 Days
    • Items Lost/Broken/Stolen (Bee): The saddest was a beautiful “guiding star” brooch my sister gave me got pinched when I stupidly left it pinned to a hoody that got packed off for a rare laundry. I also lost my sunglasses (that lasted 10 weeks!) in Galapagos, replaced them, and lost the replacement pair within a day. I also somehow lost a pair of bikini bottoms, a pair of hiking socks and my conditioner.
    • Items Lost/Broken/Stolen (Nick): Still my poor watch, but I’ve also destroyed a second pair of sunglasses. Luckily a man walked up to me in the street in Cusco the following day and sold me a pair of genuine Ray-Bans at an unbelievable price. What do you mean they’re not real? He swore they were… Other than that pretty good so far, just the usual shampoos and shower gels left in hostels.
    • Injuries/Illnesses: 1 long Peru/Poo-ru fest of a nasty sickness that seemed never ending, ruining Nick’s birthday and ending with Bee in A&E in Ecuador. It turns out that everyone we have met since who has been to Peru got poorly at some point there so we are in good company.
    • Changes to Itinerary: 3 – Seeing Chile, taking the plunge and doing the Galapagos and then cutting down our time in Colombia from a month to 2 weeks due to sickness slowing us down.

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Q&A With Bee

Three Months In, How Do You Feel? By this point of the trip I have the best of both worlds. I have hit my stride with the travelling, the language and the accumulated confidence that I can do this and surprise myself with how far I can push my comfort zone. I don’t have any of the anxiety jitters that I still suffered a month in, mainly because we are travelling cautiously and so far have had pretty much entirely positive experiences in every country. It also feels like there is so much left to see, and I definitely am not getting jaded or overloaded by new experiences. Instead I wake up every morning with my mind whirring at what incredible things I will see or do or eat or drink! I guess the only change as we shift from having more time ahead, to more time behind us (sniff!) is that I can’t help but start to cast my mind forwards to how life will change once I get home. Travelling has given me such a precious opportunity to look at how I lived previously with a ton of distance and perspective. I feel like my brain has undergone a major re-shuffle and that I’ll now live differently and with slightly altered goals once I am back in the UK and plunging into the big bad what next. I also have a huge list in my notebook of ideas and plans and projects I hope to embark on once I am back. I think travelling gives you a giddy sense of grabbing the world with both hands and really shaking life up, which in turn makes me believe (whether its true or not) that once I am home... I can have more of an impact in life rather than just living day to day in a rat racey haze. The main concern is how will I cope when I don’t get to hang out with my best friend 24/7?

Biggest Lessons Learnt: That there are pigeons in every country and that more often than not, if you are told a hostel has Aguas Caliente (hot water) it will be an absolute lie. I think hostel owners know its a buzz-word with tourists and bound to lure you in, they then act super surprised when the hose with electric cables stuck to it doesn’t run warm. This happens to us ALL the time!

Best New Skills Aquired: Snorkelling… and the ultimate skill any backpacker needs: how to fit massive objects into tiny packages. Mozzie nets, sleep sheets etc all become huge when unrolled and then somehow need to be fitted back into a bag the size of a postage stamp.

Best Moment: This is such an impossible questions, so I don’t know why I’ve just written it. I will probably go with the snorkelling with a turtle experience. It’s closely rivalled by the hot springs on the salt flats, the amazon boat thunderstorm and crossing the equator on the Galapagos.

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Worst Moment: I think it says alot about the Ecudorian healthcare system that it wasn’t being in A&E! My worst moment was definitely our boat crossing back from Isla Isabela to Puerto Ayora on the Galapagos. The trip over to Isabela had been reasonably choppy (when they hand out sick bags to everyone, including locals, before you set off… it’s never a good sign) but I coped okay and managed to keep my breakfast in my belly. The return journey made the previous trip look like a jaunt on the swans at Alton Towers! From the second we hit the water, the waves were black and crashing over the sides of the boat. As we got deeper out to sea, the ocean only grew fiercer and I have never seen water look so hateful… churning and swirling and tipping our little boat side to side so much that the windows kissed the foam. By halfway, everyone except Nick who has the sea-legs of a pirate, was green. Then the puking started. Then the moaning. Every time the boat was spat out and slapped back down onto the waves, I felt my spine cracking. The only glimmer of good was when a huge wave crashed over the back, taking with it two huge sharks who avoided landing in our laps and leapt over. It was two hours that felt like two days. Back on dry land, I had to take a moment to kiss the ground. On the bright side, we had heard the Galapagos crossings can get choppy, as so many currents meet there, and maybe we wouldn’t have had quite the full experience if we hadn’t braved it for ourselves!

Best Place Stayed: For me it was Hostel Manaus. The atmosphere was just the right amount of boozy, social, inclusive and helpful. We didn’t know it at the time, but it was here we would meet some of the best friends of our trip and people on the most fascinating journeys. We met Eduard, a wonderful Dutch man who’d relocated from setting up a successful business in Rotterdam to move to the middle of the Amazon jungle and build a farm and eco hostel from scratch. We also met Gareth, who was making a documentary about kayaking 9000km around Brazil. We met a French journalist who was in Manuas to cover the progress of the world cup stadium (and whom I imagine life has just got very chaotic for given this weeks tragedy).  Everyone, without exception, was so friendly that all our evenings naturally followed the same routine: a huge cook-out in the communal kitchen with everyone offering up ingredients, followed by a rowdy roam down the road to share giant beers and travel tales. Something that I love about hostel life, and happened in Manaus, is that you can slope up somewhere in the morning, sleepy and unsure what to expect. By nightfall you can be socialising with 2 Brazilians, a French, Dutch, German and Canadian, making friends for life.

Worst Place Stayed: The shed in Galapagos that has no name. We were given the recommendation by our cruise guide when we mentioned we wanted a cheap night somewhere central. We wandered up to a garden gate, with a scrap of paper and the name of a woman. We don’t think we ever actually found her… but ended up sleeping in a shed, with no roof (but a huge plasma tv that didnt work…) that absolutely stank of pickles. Skyler fondly named it “the big mac shack” for us. The weirdest part was that there was an en suite bathroom, but every item such as the mirror, sink and toothbrush holder was CELLOTAPED to the wall. Oh and there were two guard dogs that took an instant dislike to us and terrorised us everytime we attempted to leave or arrive.

Best “Travelator” Moment: We don’t often mock fellow travellers but you do meet the odd person who has fallen down a black hole of dreadlocks, henna tattoos, happy pants and chatting a lot of guff about energy. The KING of the travelators was a man who was staying in Huanchaco at the same time as us. He had all the usual trappings, but also insisted on constantly carrying round a giant conch shell at ALL times… occasionally petting it as if it were a baby. It took a day or so for us both to click that he wasn’t just moving it the conch from one place to another, but that it was a permanent feature. At night he would join a gang of people jamming around a bonfire, and we liked to imagine that he played along on his mournful conch.

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Best Purchase: My alpaca wool jumper in Cusco that has marching alpaca knitted around the collar.

Best Beer: Bogota Brewery Craft Beer: Honey Ale Flavour

Best Pizza: Bodega164 in Cusco. It was blue cheese, mushroom and bacon; and after months of disappointing pizza experiences it was completely mindblowing. Also, Nick chose this night to drink a beer at altitude and have a funny sick moment mid pizza, so I got all his slices too. What a champ!

Best Book Read: The Devil in The White City – Erik Larson (I cannot recommend enough, and instantly downloaded everything else he has written to my kindle and Nick & I have both consumed them at a crazy pace and enjoyed nattering about them after. He is such a talent and writes in a truly unique style)

Soundtrack to the trip: It’s funny how one song becomes a stand out. For me its “Wasting My Young Years” by London Grammar. This song blurs from my old life into the trip, as in my previous job the company I worked for was doing the visual effects on the video and its where I first heard to track. It’s a song that seems to come on my ipod at every big travel moment: arriving on the alien salt flats, flying over the Andes, rocking side to side during a night on the Galapagos cruise or zooming through Colombian coastline at 100km p h. Also, the lyrics are more than a little relevant:

I’m wasting my young years
It doesn’t matter
I’m chasing old ideas
It doesn’t matter

Don’t you know that it’s only fear
I wouldn’t worry, you have all your life
I’ve heard it takes some time to get it right

Things I Miss The Most: Baths, peanut butter, cups of tea, clean clothes, knitting by the TV… wow I sound like a little old lady, so I better add in getting drunk on happy hour with my friends in Soho.

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Q&A With Nick

Best Journey: We’ve taken some truly amazing once-in-a-lifetime trips while we’ve been here, and while sailing across the Equator, busing over the Andes, and hiking through the jungles of Tayrona would win at any other time, for me it’s still the 4-day Amazon river-boat. If someone ever offered the chance to do it again I’d accept in a heartbeat.

Friendliest Local: We’ve had amazing fortune with all the people we’ve met so far. In fact, I’ve only being randomly sworn at once, by a bus driver in Peru. But the king of the friendly locals was the owner of our hostel on Isabela (in the Galapagos), who was completely convinced we could understand his hyper-fast lisping Spanish, and whose answer to any of our queries (including ‘is there a safe?’) was to tell us not to worry, and relax.

Best Beer: I’ve heroically sampled the local beer in every country so far, one of my favourite things about backpacking. All have merits, but for the perfect refreshment to taste ratio, it will have to be Venezuela’s Polar.

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Best Ice-Cream: I’ve also been trying to put back all the weight I lost during my illness by eating ice-cream every day. Although I was doing that before, so not sure what my future excuse will be. Bee likes to say to me she’s finally seeing my unrestrained eating habits. For awhile the pick of the ice-cream litter was the Oreo sundae from Bolivia, but now Colombia has provided the reigning champ – a Mars Bar flavoured scoop covered in dark chocolate sauce (which also fills the cone underneath providing you with a frenzied eating mission at the end to stop it pouring over you).

Worst Meal: We’ve had a few shockers in our time here, but the worst surely has to be sopa del res from Santa Elena’s hungry street. Translating as soup of the beast, it was a disgusting broth of stomach lining and other mystery parts (maybe some sort of jelly marrow?) washed down with a horrible juice. Ugh.

Three Months in? I always think travelling for an extended period distorts time. I feel like the last three months have lasted forever, and happened instantly. We’ve done so much, and are in the middle of doing so much that I have yet to comprehend it all and mentally sort through it. It’s been tough at times definitely, but no more than the other times I’ve been away. On top of that though is the knowledge that me & Bee will probably never get to spend this much extended time in each other’s exclusive company, and that makes every moment really special. Even when I have to ask her to wash her socks in the sink as they’re so disgustingly smelly I can’t even be in the same room as them.

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LIST THE COUNTRIES YOU’VE VISITED IN ORDER OF PREFERENCE! DO IT NOW!!! Ok, ok… It’s a tough one, and with the caveat that we’ve still got a fair bit of Colombia to do, and our Ecuador time was spent mostly on one of the most magical places on Earth… Ecuador, Colombia, Brazil, Bolivia, Venezuela, Chile………………………………….Peru.

Bee Says:

My order of preference is a tiny bit different:

Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Brazil, Chile…….. Peru too.

When The Going Gets Tough…

Bee Says: One thing that Peru has pegged over the rest of South America… is long-haul buses. As we slummed it on junkyard rust buckets in Venezuela and Bolivia we heard travel-talk of a wonderous glimmer of hope in our future: Cruz Del Sur. Peru´s luxury bus company where apparently there were aeroplane-style TVs on every seat, blankets, PILLOWS, food, snacks and seats that reclined into beds. After enviously hearing about them for so long, it was finally our moment to experience the joy for ourselves as we boarded the 20 hour bus from Cusco to Lima. Whilst the bus lived up to all expectations (and the movies on offer were a) in English and b) really modern releases!) unfortunately we didnt know in advance that this journey was at least half spent negotiating hairpin switchbacks on the peaks of the Andes. All I can describe it as, is being on the waltzers and never being able to get off! Safe to say the bathroom was perma-occupied and we both groaned along in our luxury seats, not even being able to manage a mouthful of our fancy dinner! In Lima there are two main districts that tourists stay: Miraflores and Barranco. We opted for Barranco as we had heard it was the “arts” area and a bit less backpacked out that Miraflores.

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Any weather-homesickness was waylaid by Lima’s grey fuzzy climate. We were pleasantly suprised by Lima in alot of ways. It felt reasonably safe (although our hostel had electric fences and a 24 hour paid security guide watching it from a little hut over the road. I couldn’t decide if this was scary or reassuring. Maybe both in equal measures?), it was walkable, easy to navigate and very VERY cool. In fact, if you love Williamsburg and Berlin, you need to visit Lima soon, as Barranco particularly is the next big Hipster haven. All the usual East London trappings could be found here: coffee culture, mega music scene, red skinny jeans, Edward Scissorhands-esque hair, Liberty print nikes and generally achingly hip youths roaming about the place. We weren´t expecting it at all, and whilst it was nice to have a few home comforts (eg I didnt have to miss out on a festive Red Cup at Starbucks!) and I tried to first Pinkberry fro-yo, it was strange to be somewhere that felt so well.. like the UK or US.

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Lima felt like somewhere more that you would go on holiday to, than somewhere that has much to offer from a cultural perspective. Although we did hunt out an amazing local restaruant to sample a heaving plate of Ceviche (raw fish marinated in lemon juice & spiced with chilli). I would highly recommend the walk from Barranco to Miraflores too; it took about an hour each way but takes you along a quaint costal path and is a great way to explore the city. Our walk had an aim, and that was to go to the cinema to see Thor 2! After trekking all the way there, sadly we received the news that it was in Spanish, so although entertaining it wouldn’t have been quite as enjoyable. Nick, aka mr Marvel, took the news very hard. As a booby prize they were showing Gravity in English (with Spanish subtitles) so we hit the popcorn stand and saw that instead. It was novel to go the cinema in Peru and Gravity was showing from a proper film reel, the whirring and ticking of which you could hear over the space noises throughout! We spent a lovely last evening in a converted train carriage (that was British like us) and playing scrabble, which has a whole host of new letters in the Spanish version.

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Nick Says: I didn’t expect to spend the day of our two month travel anniversary sat on the toilet with a bad bout of traveller’s diarrhoea, alternating turns on it with the similarly affected Bee. I hadn’t even had time to enjoy recovering from being ill in Cusco, so this felt particularly cruel.

We had left Lima in good spirits, getting another Cruz del Sur to the town of Trujillo, in the north of Peru. From there we strolled 5 minutes into town and hopped on a collectivo (mini-bus) to the beach town of Huanchaco, about 20 minutes away. While still grey, the weather felt a bit warmer, our hostel had a very relaxed vibe, and we were gearing up to make it to Ecuador. Due to the bus time tables we had a few days to kill, but where better to do that than on the beach? I even rewarded myself with a big beer the first night we were there, savouring the taste. Huanchaco seemed laid back, and we enjoyed taking a walk around, visiting the pier where all the locals spent Sunday fishing from it, and planned a trip to visit some pre-Inca ancient ruins nearby.

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But oh dear. The next few days were not pleasant. We’ve no idea what struck us down, but it was agony. Knowing this was a bad bout, Bee heroically set off to the pharmacy to get us antibiotics (ciprofloxacin in this case, which acted quickly). All thoughts of the delicious looking chocolate cake in the hostel’s restaurant were forgotten as the absolute misery of being unwell took hold again. It was desperate stuff, and we needed to make sure we kept hydrated. Ever since I ended up in hospital in Australia not knowing my name or where I lived I’ve always had a healthy respect for the need to keep hydrated when sick abroad. Anyone travelling themselves ignores this at their peril.

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A few days later, and seemingly on the mend we boarded what we hoped would be one of our last long bus journeys. This one would be an 20 hour beast to Guayaquil in Ecuador, from where we would set off to the fabled Galapagos Islands. After much toing and froing, we had decided to make the trip there. When else in our lives would we be this close to the islands? A very welcome tax return (yes, they do exist) also eased the financial concerns we had (the islands were unaffordable on our original budget) as did talking to several backpackers who had travelled the Galapagos independently, and told us you definitely didn’t need to spend thousands on the trip – you could visit very reasonably. So now we were set fair to get to the islands, and we couldn’t wait.

We also couldn’t wait to be shot of Peru. It obviously didn’t help that we’d been sick there, but Peru was definitely both mine and Bee’s least favourite place we’d been to. It’s difficult to explain, but it didn’t quite spark to life the way every other country. Travelling is very much an emotional trip as well as a sensory one, and it was hard to make the connection with Peru. Perhaps its due to the fact that its currently racing towards embracing a western way of life, and therefore felt too much like home? But then I’ve been places that are just like the UK and loved them. For me Peru felt a bit flat, and that’s to take nothing away from all the amazing things I saw there, and I absolutely adored the few days we spent in Ollantaytambo especially. I just wasn’t that sorry to leave, and I probably wouldn’t hurry to come back…

Bee Says: Finally it was time to leave our Huanchaco “prison”, but not before I had locked our keys in the room meaning I had to then break back in through the window. We caught the bus from Trujillo, right up to Guayaquil in Ecuador. If you are crossing from Peru to Ecuador, it is worth either flying or taking a decent international bus like we did, because it is a notoriously bad border crossing and it helps to be travelling with Spanish speaking locals. Whilst the stamping in and our process was easy enough, our bus was stopped four times and had its contents spilled out onto roads/car parks as suitcases and bags were searched. On our final stop, we had to get out and the bus drove through a giant x-ray machine! One nice addition to a long journey, was that spookily the couple sat in the seats in front of us happened to be the Swiss couple we had been for a meal with on the Isla Del Sol, the night we got caught in a hail storm! They are heading up to Central America next, so I’m hoping we bump into them again in Mexico.

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Arriving in Guayquil we both mentioned that we felt a burst of having our travel mojo back! Nick’s already touched on our thoughts, and I felt almost relieved to leave Peru behind. Although Guayaquil is rough around the edges and a hustling bustling city, it felt exciting and welcoming and we couldn´t wait to explore. We had one day to do this, as we planned to fly out to Galapagos ASAP, but sadly… one day turned into, well, seven! Our Ecuador optimism was short lived, as at 6am the next day I woke up and my insides were on FIRE! I had surgery last year so am currently quite pain-aware. I know the pains that can be grumbled and slept off, and I know the pains that mean get-me-to-A&E, and sadly this was the latter. We had a really helpful hotel receptionist who recommended a hospital with an English speaking doctor. Within ten minutes I was in hospital, on a drip and being treated by the Ecuadorian version of Zach Braff in Scrubs, a dashing chap with perfect English who all the nurses were openly swooning over (and me, a little bit, but he was called Nick too so thats allowed… right?). The diagnosis was that the nasty infection in Peru, followed by 20 hours on a bus (where I confess, I didnt drink enough water) had left me dehydrated with intenstine cramps… as painful as they sound! I spent a day on a drip getting pumped with various different potions, and was discharged that night, with a bundle of drugs to take for the next week and instructions to REST and stick to a liquid diet for a day or so. Needing Emergency Hospital treatment in a foreign country is up there with the scariest things that can happen. I was very fortunate to be in a big city (imagine if this had happened on the Amazon boat?!) and a country with great medical care available. But, hopefully this is reassuring that it doesnt need to be the end of the world (or your trip). If you find yourself needing medical attention whilst travelling, its a good idea to get yourself to the nearest major town or city, and then to Google for the list of hospitals with English speaking staff, as this will help reduce the trauma and any mis-translation, which I suffered from briefly when the doctor doing my ultrasound got yes and no muddled and told me I had appendicitis…. then no, no I didnt. Agh. I have a whole new respect for hydration too. Travelling puts your body under a fair amount of stress, and the main thing you can do to support it is keeping drinking. And then drink some more. Rehydration sachets are also my new best friend, even if its like drinking the ocean. In general make sure you are never far from a bottle of water and that you pack a wogde of electrolytes for your trip.

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There is a silver lining to everything in my world, and although I wouldnt want to repeat being poorly, it was interesting to spend a day in my own medical telenovella! I also have really enjoyed recovering in Guayaquil and spending some quality time in this wonderful city. We are staying Downtown, where the “Malecon 2000” is a renovated riverfront that London would be jealous of. Beautiful views, modern architecture and lucious gardens have been a lovely place to sit and recover (and eat ice cream under the giant Christmas tree… totally a liquid!) Our pre-sick-plan meant the only bit of Ecuador we would have seen would be the Galapagos. It will be nice to wrap up South America having really experienced mainland Ecuador too.

Nick Says: One of the unexpected benefits of having a LOT more time in Guayaquil is taking our time to explore the city, and uncover some of the little secrets that you may miss if you’re dashing through. In this case, it was Parque Simon Bolivar. A really nicely maintained city centre park, it’s elevated into greatness by the fact it’s home to a large population of giant iguanas! They’re absolutely incredible, and absolutely massive too. They roam around the place dinosaur-like, clambering over all the lawns and benches (and us as well when we got in their way). They also scale up the trees to a great height, and then seem to delight in weeing off the top. So watch out for iguana wee falling on your head. Not pleasant! I’ve also now had the privilege of seeing a pigeon sat on an iguana’s head. Beautiful.

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Iguanas aside, we’ve also become devotees of Guayaquil’s favourite coffee chain, the mighty Sweet & Coffee. While the coffee’s could probably be a little better, they make up for this with a dizzying array of cakes. Whatever you fancy, they’ve got it. In fact, we’re going to celebrate writing this blog post and feeling healthy again by going to the nearest branch and ordering a mocha-frappelatte and a caramel apple cheesecake. I’ve, umm, got weight to put back on after all the sicking and pooing…

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And that´s about all for now. Guayaquil has been brilliant, even if I don’t suggest you spend 7 days here. But well worth at least a few, if you’re ever in this part of the world. It even has an amazing IMAX cinema on the Malecon, which me and Bee visited last night to watch Thor 2 (finally! and in 3D!). Being as it was the original English version (not dubbed) and on at 10.15pm on a Tuesday, we were unsurprisingly the only patrons. Sat alone with our popcorn in a giant auditorium. Anyway, tomorrow we fly to the Galapagos and we are buzzing with excitement. November may have been a bit tough, but we are ready for more adventure.

Bee Says: November has been a lesson in when things go wrong! Up until this point we spent our first two months completley in control of our itinerary. We stuck to plans, we had time on our side and we probably got a little too comfortable. The reality of travelling is that things happen that you can’t control, and these seven days eating cake have thrown our budget massively off (Guayaquil accomodation, even budget stuff, is super pricey, as its basically the gateway to Galapagos) and we are now running out of time to spend in Colombia – where we had once allowed for spending a month there, we have now shrunken that down to about 10 days. But, what else can we do except suck it up and roll with the punches. We will now have to opt for flights, over our beloved epic bus journies, and slice off non-priority plans from the rest of South America. Whatever happens… I think the next two weeks in Galapagos will make the tough-stuff worthwhile.

The Backstory

WELCOME! Have a look around, be sure to read all about who we are and what we are doingmeet Nick, meet Bee and swat up on where our South & Central American travels will take us. With a month to go until we head up, up and away, we thought we’d start by filling you in on when the plans for this adventure first began…

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Bee says: Ever since we met, Nick & I have been committed to taking a huge adventure. Nick has done quite a bit of backpacking before, and is certainly bitten by the bug. I love visiting foreign lands, but have never had that opportunity to skip out on real life and leave the country for any extended amount of time. For this reason… it would probably surprise all of our friends and family to learn that it was ME who first suggested this trip.

Nick & I first met two years ago (almost exactly) at Media Guardia Edinburgh International Television Festival. We were both a few years into careers in the media, and applied for a scheme called “Ones to Watch” which gives you the training, exposure and access to big TV cheeses to in theory “fast track” your career.  From hundreds of applicants we were both selected to attend. Part of the application had been to pitch an idea for a strand in BBC2’s The Culture Show and out of the 40 delegates, four of us were chosen to then pitch the idea LIVE to a panel of industry experts/commissioners and in front of an audience of 200 wider television festival attendees. So, kind of like Dragon’s Den, but live, and with our entire future media careers and reputations on the line. No pressure! You can probably guess where this is leading… Both Nick & I were selected and had to go head to head, in this super daunting and pressured environment. We love to think about the geeky maths and statistics involved in us meeting – both being selected from 500+, to 40, to 4. It’s strange to the think how many people and processes played a part in our relationship. Rather than becoming sworn rival enemies, we actually helped each other practice and prepare and over post-its, power points and cue cards…  Neither of us won the pitch, but we did win each others hearts (way better than five minutes of fame) and that night we celebrated our blossoming love in that classiest of ways; tequila!

In a Jose Cuervo fuelled haze, at 2am, I asked Nick if he wanted to run away? It’s the first and only time I will ever ask someone this question, and despite only knowing me for about 36 hours at this stage, luckily for me he said yes. It may have taken two years of scrimping, saving (discovering Friday Night Lights and swiftly consuming all five seasons really helped with this part) and then the perfect opportunity landing in our laps to get that one-way flight booked, but here we are teetering on the edge of a month to go and we’ve finally come good on that drunken promise. I can’t wait to drink tequila IN Tequila, Mexico to celebrate…

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Nick says: Bee’s pretty much summed it up right there. Well, at least the reality of how this trip is happening. The truth is that for me, I’ve wanted to go to South America since I was 18. I always knew that I would go back-packing after Uni. With my friend Mark, I planned a grand trip to Australia, South-East Asia and then through Asia, a quick stop back in the UK to say hello, then onto South America. Except it didn’t quite work out like that. Not knowing the world’s greatest recession was just around the corner, I blindly leapt into the unknown in late November 2006, visiting Oz and South-East Asia and returning 9 months later after detouring to South Korea for a month to help teach/have a quick look in North Korea. Broken both financially and physically (thank-you Thai boxer), I needed to get a job.

So I moved to London. And there I struggled to earn a living, pay rent, and have a life. I tried to save, I really did. But my token travel fund never really got above £1000. Then I spent that clearing my credit card debt. All the while, people I knew always asked me if I’d made it to South America, then expressed surprise when I said I hadn’t., ‘Oh, I thought that’s what you told everyone?’. Then they started going over there themselves. While I lived in an over-priced box room in East London. I told myself I only wanted to go there if I could go for months on end, otherwise what was the point? Then I started going to other places instead – the Czech Republic, Hungary, Serbia, Albania, Italy, India, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany. Short trips, but trips all the same. But was I scratching an itch or feeding the beast? South America began to sound like a pipe dream, something you tell yourself, ‘I’ll do that one day for sure’, and then never do.

Then I met Bee. Then we had a tequila fuelled conversation. Then I knew I was going to make it to South America after all.  I’d always planned a solo trip, but truthfully I probably would never have made it without her. We got organised, motivated, and dedicated to saving. I changed career path in order to become freelance and give myself the flexibility to take this trip – and then that paid off when an absolutely brilliant work opportunity came along which enabled us to go ahead of schedule and live the dream (and claim we’re busy dammit!) Now here we are – about to finally reach South and Central America.

// Before we leave the UK, we’ll be blogging about our experience in preparing for something like this – particularly focusing on saving and budget tips, the medical implications (no one can prime you for the news that you need 15 vaccinations!) and packing; given that we have opted for the smallest 35 litre option backpacks, packing for six months will certainly require some sort of miracle.